Me & My Dad

My dad …. born in Maury County, Tennessee on October 22, 1932. His parents were William Henry Norman & Mary Caroline Gibson (both born in the late 1800s). My dad, Charles William Norman, was the second of their three children. I remember him as a tall and strong man. He was kind, giving and enjoyed people. He was funny and sometimes a bit of a prankster. He loved his kids and he worked hard to give them a better life. He had only an 8th grade education, but was smarter than most of the people I know. I think a favorite time in his life was when he was in law enforcement. These pictures were made when he worked for the Pasco County (Florida) Sheriff’s Office (Leland Thompson was the sheriff). Back then, you – as a deputy – had to buy your own car. He later worked for the Dade City Police Department, serving as an officer and detective. I think he felt that he made a difference, served honorably, was loyal and a man of his word & was a good role model for his kids. I have often wished that I had been given more time with him; as I lost him only after 16 years. I do believe that I am his daughter & he would be standing proud beside me today if he could. I – like my dad – am a dreamer. I know that I have some of his strength, his desire to serve and love others, his loyalty to those that I call & know as a friend, love for my family, & a drive to be better, because the world may be a little better for it. 

#dad #tjnv #godisgreat #lifeisgood #genealogy #maurycounty #maurycountytn #respect #honor #serveothers #leo #bluelivesmatter #parents #dreamer #loyaltofriends

Early Tennessee Map – 1818

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John Melish’s 1818 State of Tennessee map.  This map is held in the Tennessee State Library and Archives Historical Map collection.  Reprints and reproductions can be obtained through the Library and Archives HERE.

This is a beautiful map of the State of Tennessee.  It was created in 1818 by John Melish (1771-1822) using the surveys of John Strothers.  The map displays early county lines and the then existing Indian boundaries.

John Melish was a Scottish mapmaker and publisher. In 1811, Melish settled in Philadelphia, working on atlases and maps.  He is very well known as a creator/publisher some of the best maps in early America.

Melish produced a map of the United States in 1816, which he sent to former President Thomas  Jefferson.  Jefferson was so impressed with Melish’s work that he offered a few suggestions for correction, primarily regarding the boundaries of Louisiana and west.  Jefferson’s letter offering suggestions to John Melish is held within the Jefferson papers within the Library of Congress (it is digitally available by clicking here) .  According to the Thomas Jefferson Foundation, Jefferson placed a copy of the Melish produced United States map was placed in the Entrance Hall at Monticello, Jefferson’s home.

#earlyusmaps #historicalmaps #earlytennesseemaps #tennessee #tennesseehistory #tennesseemaps #usmaps #usmaps #johnmelish #1818 #1818maps

The new Tennessee State Museum 

Look what’s coming to Nashville!  It is a new Tennessee State Museum and the creators are promising an amazing visual experience. new tn state museum2.png

Approximately $120 million will be invested to create a spectacular “walk through” the creation of the state of Tennessee and present a very hands-on  children’s learning center and gallery. The main exhibit space will total some 60,000 square feet with smaller theater rooms.

The new Tennessee State State Museum is scheduled to open its doors in the Fall of 2018. Sounds like it will be a perfect time to plan a trip to Nashville to soak up some history and learning through the new museum.  With of course some adequate researching time scheduled at the State Archives center!!

Read the story here in the Tennessean.

These photos are renderings for the Museum created by the renowned Gallagher & Associates, an internationally recognized Museum Planning and Design Firm with offices in Washington D.C., New York, San Francisco and Singapore. 

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#Tennessee #tennesseehistory #history #genealogy #maurycountytn #statehistory #museum #historymuseum #tennesseemuseum #gallagher&associates

 

My Valentines ❤️

My Valentines ❤️️ – Charles William Norman & Dalsie Mabel Mills, my parents. This picture was taken in 1956 at a state fair, before they married. They both were about 24 years old. My dad was killed in a vehicle crash in 1979 (I was 16). My mom never remarried & lived until 2009. She always said that my dad was the “only man she ever loved.” Their marriage was not perfect — far from it — but their love always prevailed. They taught their children to “do unto others as you would have done unto you”, love from the heart, reach for your dreams and God is great — they showed us how to live, love & laugh. 💕They will always be my Valentines. #family #parents #dad #mom #valentines #livelovelaugh #godisgreat #followyourdreams #genealogy #jennealogy #myjennealogy

One of my Favorite Veterans

Floyd Mayhue Mills & his wife Anne Elizabeth Cole Mills. This picture taken at Fort Smith Arkansas in 1944. Floyd was about 32 years old & Anne would have been about 30. Floyd & Anne are my maternal grandparents. Thank you for your service granddad & great American values that your family still upholds & appreciates. 💕 #jennealogy #wwiivet #veterans #veteransday2016 #grandparents #proud #american #myjennealogy

IT’S QUITE A LINE-UP!!! The FREE Genealogy Webinars Announced for 2017

The folks over at the Legacy Family Tree Webinars are doing a great job of providing amazing educational webinars for genealogist at all levels. They have just released their 2017 Legacy Faminnovationily Tree Webinar Series.  This is a series of several webinars each month by expert and interesting genealogy lecturers/teachers.  High quality speakers, talking on interesting topics for genealogist & it’s FREE.  Whether you sign up for one (1) class or all 76 classes — it’s FREE.  Each webinar is scheduled for about an hour & a half (1 1/2 hours).

SO — with this wonderful opportunity I have already put things in motion to help me achieve a NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION! — yep! I registered for at least one (1) webinar each month of 2017.  A little investing in myself . . . .  I will be learning from some of my favorites, including Judy Russell, Thomas MacEntee, Diahan Southard, Lisa Louise Cooke, Lisa Alzo, Jill Morelli, Geoffrey Rasmussen, Angela Packer McGhie, Cyndi Ingle, and Mary Hill.

Register now for free (what a great Christmas!! & New Years!).    CLICK HERE to go to their website and register for your favorite “genea-lebrities” or your favorite genealogy subject matter.   Want to register for more than one class at a time ?  CLICK HERE to signup for all you favs at one time.

—  oh yea ….. spread the joy before the classes fill up & share with only your closest genealogy friends.

 

 

2016 New Year’s Resolution – Organize My Genealogy!

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With 2016 just around the corner, I am thinking about New Year’s Resolutions for my genealogy life (plus other areas).  The start of a new year seems to be the perfect time to focus on organizing those mounds of loose papers and files.  I have “started organizing” them several times.  It sometimes feels like I have reorganized so many times that I am unsure what I have, much less where I put it.

Organizing my genealogy is a MUST-DO and is number one for my genealogy New Year’s Resolutions!

Lucky for me — and others like me — Thomas MacEntee over at Geneabloggers is offering great assistance and a plan with a monthly focus over the 2016 year.

During 2015,  MacEntee had released several “weekly” topics/lessons to help family researchers hit the “RESET” button and clean-up accumulated pieces.  I really wanted to do this – but failed miserably – probably due to the pace of the topics (weekly) and the juggling of the rest of my life (full-time job and family).  I am hoping that a year’s plan with a monthly topic is the answer.  It should provide the added emphasis that I need, at a reasonable pace.

MacEntee’s long awaited Genealogy Do-Over Workbook  will be available through Amazon.com on Monday, December 28th. A Kindle version should be available for about $5.99, making it a “must have”.   This will be a wonderful resource to help me get a jumpstart on the plan.

Then starting Friday, January 1, 2016, at the Genealogy Do-Over Blog  , MacEntee will be posting a lesson/topic  each month for the entire year of 2016.

For more information and a listing of the yearly topics click over to check out the post from MacEntee:

The Genealogy Do-Over: 2016 Topics

The Genealogy Do-Over switches to a monthly format for topics in 2016 – here is the lineup.

2016 Monthly Topics/Lineup

 

Tennessee’s County Records

image_stacks_of_genealogy_recordsLooking for County Records in Tennessee?  here’s a list  of dates when records were lost or destroyed  because of courthouse fires or other disasters in Tennessee counties … Amazing – my family’s county — Maury — has never lost records because of disasters, i.e. fire, tornado, etc… clink this link to check your Tennessee county.  http://ow.ly/UgzC0

Nelly Gilliam

Gilliam, Miss Neil, single, born 18 Oct 1883 in Maury, died 10 Jan. 1928 of uraemia coma due to nephritis; buried Morton Cemetery, daughter of Jim Gilliam, born in Maury, and Nancy Miller, born in Maury; information by Mrs. Pearl Hardison, Route 9, Lewisburg, Tenn.

SOURCE: Jill Garrett’s Maury County Genealogist, Vol. 2 – 1973, pg 69, copied from Record of Deaths, Book 8, District 4, 1922-1928.

MyJennealogy Note: Nelly Gilliam was the daughter of James Riley Gilliam and Nancy Miller.  This is my 1st cousin 3x removed.

John Henry Gilliam

“Death’s Harvest.

Aged 97 Years.

John H. Gilliam died last Friday, Jan. 14, at his home near Leftwich in the 3rd district of this county. Deceased had lived to the ripe old age of 97 years, having first seen the light of day in Wythe County, Virginia, on the 24th day of November, 1800, a little over a year after the death of George Washington. When 8 years of age, he, with his father and mother and three other children, moved to Tennessee and settled near Rock Spring in this county, at which time this section of the country was very sparsedly settled. Shortly after the closing of the Civil War, he moved to the 3rd district, where he has since lived. He leaves one sister, Mrs. Nancy Hardison, who will soon be 83 years old, and one son and daughter, who have both passed the marks of “three score years and ten.” His second wife, who is 73 years old, also survives him. The funeral services were conducted at the residence and the burial took place in the (Robert) Hardison graveyard near Rock Spring.”.

SOURCE: Columbia Herald, January 21, 1898.

MyJennealogy Note:  This is my 4th great grandfather.