My Valentines ❤️

My Valentines ❤️️ – Charles William Norman & Dalsie Mabel Mills, my parents. This picture was taken in 1956 at a state fair, before they married. They both were about 24 years old. My dad was killed in a vehicle crash in 1979 (I was 16). My mom never remarried & lived until 2009. She always said that my dad was the “only man she ever loved.” Their marriage was not perfect — far from it — but their love always prevailed. They taught their children to “do unto others as you would have done unto you”, love from the heart, reach for your dreams and God is great — they showed us how to live, love & laugh. 💕They will always be my Valentines. #family #parents #dad #mom #valentines #livelovelaugh #godisgreat #followyourdreams #genealogy #jennealogy #myjennealogy

Advertisements

Veterans’ Day – Dedicated to the Cause of World Peace

Norman Charles WAccording to Military.com, Veterans Day (November 11th) was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor Armistice Day – the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. Established by Congress in 1938, November 11 was “dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.’ The declared holiday honored the veterans of World War I. Then in 1954, following both World War II and the Korean War, the Act of 1938 was amended by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans.” November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars. Today I think of all the those within my family that sacrificed so much to serve America in wars that have been critical for world peace.  They were dedicated to the preservation of freedoms and liberties of our Nation and throughout the world.  For over 235 years, members of my family have defended and fought for the sacred values held within their hearts, many of the same are written within the Bible and the documents of our Nation’s foundation.  They have  served and fought for freedom not only because they felt it was their duty, but because they knew it was a call of honor.  Today I enjoy many liberties and freedom in America because of those who served and sacrificed for all.   Thank you to many family members, particularly the following:

  • Thanks to my husband for serving in the Persian Gulf War, including service in Desert Shield and Desert Storm.
  • Thanks to my dad, Charles W. Norman (1932-1979), for serving in the Korean War, as a member of the U.S. Army.   He entered into active service on February 20, 1953 in Nashville, Tennessee as a Private – 2nd Class.  He was promoted to Corporal (T) June 29, 1954.  He was transferred to the US Army Reserves on December 18, 1954 through Fort Knox, Kentucky.  He remained in the US Army Reserves, in standby mode, until he was fully released and honorably discharged on February 24, 1961. He received several metals for his service, including National Defense Service Metal (NDSM), United Nations Service Metal (UNSM), Korean Service Metal (KSM) and Good Conduct Metal (GCM).
  • Thanks to my great uncle William “Bill” Cole (1923-2002), a pilot serving in World War II.   He enlisted in the Army  on the 29th December of 1942, serving until October 17, 1945 as a Private.
  • Thanks to my granddad, Floyd M. Mills (1913-1981), for serving during World War II.  My grandfather served in World War II as a member of the U.S. Army.   He was enlisted on April 8, 1944 in Camp Shelby, Mississippi as a Private.  I know from stories by my mom and grandmother that at some point my grandfather was stationed in Texas and later served in Germany.
  • Thanks to my great-grandfather George W. Gibson (1844-1923) for serving during the Civil War.  He was wounded at Ramond, Mississippi in 1863 with a mini ball in his left shoulder. A small  Bible in his pocket deflected the bullet away from his heart. He was a prisoner in Yankee Camps at Fort Donelson in Nashville, Tn in 1864.
  • Thanks to my great-grandfather John M. Tucker (1840-1888), for serving during the Civil War.  He was captured, imprisoned and traded several times during his service.  He was hit by a riffle ball in the hip, and although he was crippled from the shot, he continued to serve.   Continuing problems with this crippling wound lead to his early death.
  • Thanks to my great-great-great-great-grandfather, James Gilliam (1733-1794), who served in military operations of the American Revolutionary War with the Colonial soldiers of Lunenburg County, Virginia, including rangers and militia.
  • Thanks to my great-great-great-great-grandfather, Joseph Lafayette Norman (1750-1809), who is believed to have served during the American Revolutionary War, possibly within the North Carolina militia.

Thank you to all of the men and women who have served and do serve in defending America, the values of life, liberty and freedom, and the hope of world peace.

Happy Birthday Daddy!

Happy birthday to my Dad today!  Charles William Norman was born October 22, 1932 in Southport, Maury County, Tennessee.  He is the son of William Henry Norman (1894 – 1975) and Mary Caroline Gibson Norman (1898 – 1968).  Charles was one of three (3) children.  His older sister Susie Helon Norman Duncan was already 12 years old when he was born and his younger brother arrived a few years later. 
Charles, also called “Sonny” by his family, was always a bit of a prankster.  It seems that his “fun-natured” side may have been influenced greatly by his mom.   He looked for ways to have fun, pull off a joke or two and laugh a little. 
Charles served his country in the US Army during the Korean War.  While serving he was about 30 years old.  He wrote letters home and sent some pictures.   He was proud of his service and always honored America. 
After returning from the war, he married Jo Evelyn Gilliam on January 17, 1953.   They had one child and later divorced. 
On December 8, 1956 Charles married Dalsie Mabel Mills.  They married in Corinth, Mississippi.  Dalsie already had two children from her prior marriage to William Marcus Byrd.  They bought a house in Columbia, Tennessee but only lived there briefly before moving to Gibsonton, Florida.  Gibsonton was a small community in the Tampa-bay area.  Charles and Dalsie had two children that were born in Florida and continue to reside  there today. 
Charles quit school after completing the 8th grade.  An 8th grade education was not so very abnormal at the time.  Much of the population at the time did not have a high school diploma, but I believe that this was something that he later regretted.  He raised his children to appreciate the importance of an education.  I remember him saying, “Stay in school and get your education because it is the one thing that no one can take away from you.”  He was a very smart man. 
He drove semi-trucks for a living much of his life.  He also worked as a deputy sheriff for the Pasco County, Florida Sheriff’s and a police officer/detective for the Dade City, Florida Police Department in the late 1960s and early 1970s.  He then worked as the Assistant Public Works Director for Dade City and later the Public Works Director for Adel, Georgia.  
Charles and his family moved back to the Dade City, Florida area after leaving Adel, Georgia around 1975.   Times were hard and there were few jobs to be found.  Charles returned to driving a semi-truck.  
On November 21, 1979, at the young age of 47, Charles was killed in a tragic vehicle accident in Dennison, Iowa.   He is buried at Floral Memory Gardens Cemetery, Dade City, Florida.

Let us remember! Be thankful and Uphold Liberty

“Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, that we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe to assure the survival and the success of liberty.”   John F. Kennedy

Don’t forget to thank a soldier for his/her sacrifices that have been made for your freedom and remember the generations before us that understood the price of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

This is my dad, Charles William Norman, son of William Henry Norman and Mary Caroline Gibson Norman on Maury County, Tennessee.  My dad served in the Korean War as a member of the U.S. Army.   He entered into active service on February 20, 1953 in Nashville, Tennessee as a Private – 2 Class.  He was promoted to Corporal (T) June 29, 1954.  He was transferred to the US Army Reserves on December 18, 1954 through Fort Knox, Kentucky.  He remained in the US Army Reserves, in standby mode, until he was fully released and honorably discharged on February 24, 1961. He received several metals for his service, including National Defense Service Metal (NDSM), United Nations Service Metal (UNSM), Korean Service Metal (KSM) and Good Conduct Metal (GCM).
This is my grandfather, Floyd Mahue Mills, son of Milton Everett and Lunie Mae Gilliam of Maury County, Tennessee.  My grandfather served in World War II as a member of the U.S. Army.   He was enlisted on April 8, 1944 in Camp Shelby, Mississippi as a Private.  I know from stories by my mom and grandmother that at some point my grandfather was stationed in Texas and later served in Germany.  Details of his service record are on my research list to locate.
Thank you one and all who have served and those that continue to serve in the United States military.  God bless America.